Fetch 2

Fetch 2

Last year I started working on my first iOS app as a way to learn Swift. What I built turned out to be a fairly popular client for Put.io. With the release of the Apple TV, porting the app was a no brainer and with it came additional features — chiefly the matching of posters and metadata. After a couple of updates my attention moved back to the iPhone and iPad in November, and for the last 5 months I've been working on a huge update… What's new? There's a lot of new stuff in Fetch 2 — from minor tweaks…

Setting Fetch Free

Setting Fetch Free

Fetch was the first iOS project I ever made and has been the most successful both on iPhone and on Apple TV. Today, I'm dropping the £2.99 price tag and am pleased to say Fetch is now free for both iOS and tvOS. If you've not used Fetch before, then now is the time to give it a go. The new price should be live on the App Store now! Moving Forward I made Fetch because I wanted a good put.io client for my iPhone and iPad. When the Apple TV came out I knew it was perfect…

Deeplinking  (how to force out of Facebook's in-app browser and fallback on desktop)

Deeplinking (how to force out of Facebook's in-app browser and fallback on desktop)

So it turns out these in-app web views can't die quick enough (hello, SafariViewController!). Marty tweeted he was trying to get YouTube videos to open in the native iOS app rather than on the website but was finding it impossible. By default, the iOS app adds a URL scheme to open youtube.com links. When someone texts you a link to a video, Safari will redirect you to the app. However, Facebook's in-app browser (and Twitter's and I expect others) doesn't honour this and linking to the youtube:// URL scheme doesn't work either. Workaround With JavaScript It turns out, if…